Author

Jennifer Denison

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Jennifer Denison submitted her first article and photographs to Western Horseman in 1991 at age 18. To her chagrin, the article was returned with many red marks and a rejection note. She took the edits to heart, though, and pursued her passion for writing and photographing horses and the Western lifestyle throughout college. After more than 20 years in the equine publishing field, 17 of which she has worked for Western Horseman, she likes to think both her storytelling and photography abilities have improved, but she still has a lot to accomplish.

Growing up in Woodland Park, Colorado, Jennifer developed diverse interests in art, music, hunting and horses. She competed in 4-H and youth rodeo, helped on a family ranch for 14 years and rode all over the Colorado Rocky Mountains with her father, who was an avid hunter and packer.

Jennifer was the 1994 recipient of the American Horse Publications Student Award, which jumpstarted her career. After graduating from Colorado State University in 1995 with double majors in equine science and technical journalism and a minor in art, she was hired by Horse & Rider magazine as assistant editor, and throughout her six years with the magazine she advanced to senior editor. In 2002 she joined the Western Horseman staff as senior editor and continues to hold that title. She also serves on the AHP Board of Directors.

Known as the staff’s “road warrior,” Jennifer takes pride in continuing Western Horseman’s legacy of taking readers to remote areas of the West and documenting the colorful cowboys and artists who share their stories with her. She thrives on finding the humble horsemen hidden in the sagebrush and sharing their experience and knowledge, or immersing herself in a small-town event celebrating horsemanship and the Western lifestyle. Her favorite subjects to cover are vaquero traditions, sustainable ranching, family ranches, art and music.

At home she has two horses and two dogs. In her limited free time, she is developing her ranch roping skills and continues to roam the mountains of Colorado or in the red rocks of northern Arizona.


wild horse in weeds

New Mexico’s high desert is an unforgiving land, one of climatic extremes, sparse water and dry forage. But to the bands of wild horses lurking within the juniper, sagebrush and pines, it’s a place of freedom and peace.

The Early Californios Skills of the Rancho celebrates Californio traditions with demonstrations of masterful horsemanship, skillful roping and methodical…