Whether you opt for a D-ring snaffle or a “tongue-ringer, copper curb,” super puncher Dale Brisby says the important thing is the bit needs to look cool.

Dale Brisby, the ultimate “super puncher,” takes a walk down his wall of bits.

“I have 24 bits for my three horses,” he says. “But what bit you use is not that important. It’s all about what you look like.” Although horseman Parke Greeson, who visited with Brisby awhile back, would probably disagree with those bold statements.

“The only reason you’re going to want to use [a D-ring snaffle] is if you’re trying to get into some D-ring, ring snaffle fraternity,” says Brisby. “Apparently you can win a lot of money at them. I’m not sure. I’ve never been.”

Next, Brisby holds up a rope halter. He says it’s the the only piece of equipment a cowboy needs to start a colt.

“Because if it bucks, what I’m going to do is try it in the bucking chutes, Ol’ Son,” he says. “You want to buck? Let’s see if you can make me more money over there.”

Brisby has a healthy collection of bits hanging in his tackroom, despite only using about 10 of them. He picks up a couple and names them off.

“This is a swivel shank, medium-high port low on the grind with the swivel,” he says. “I hate to bore you guys with any sort of technical terms. Here is a tongue-ringer, copper curb swivel-shank swivel. I could talk for days and days, but I’m not going to. The point is, I want to get an effective bit in the horse, in the mouth of the horse, so I can look cool.”

Brisby’s takeaway message is horse people should be less concerned with what bit they’re using and more aware of how they look using it.

“Be the man of the tack room,” he ends. “You’re welcome, I just saved you a lot of money on a bunch of bits you don’t need. Find one that looks cool, and you’re done.”

In Part 2 of Brisby’s Bit Talk, the super puncher shows how to “put one on a horse.”

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