Author

Susan Morrison

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Managing Editor Susan Morrison grew up in South Texas. Although no one else in her family was bitten by the horse bug, she was fortunate enough to be able to ride with friends, and was able to buy her first horse—a 2-year-old Appaloosa mare—while in high school. After studying animal health technology at Sul Ross State University for a year, she transferred to Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M University at Kingsville) and worked for the Quarter Horse division at the legendary King Ranch for two years.

Ultimately graduating from Texas Woman’s University with a journalism degree, she spent the first 10 years of her career in the newspaper industry, and then worked in media relations for several years. She joined Cowboy Publishing Group’s Quarter Horse News in 2005, and moved to Western Horseman in 2010.

Susan has shown cutting horses since the mid-1990s. In 2017 she won the American Paint Horse Association world championship in amateur cutting on her mare, Ima Pinta Playgirl. She also has a Paint gelding that she enjoys riding and taking him to occasional ranch sortings. She is involved with several dog rescue groups, fostering and transporting animals in need, and has several dogs of her own.


Mortenson shop

Clint Mortenson took a roundabout route to get to where he is, but the journey helped the silversmith and saddlemaker focus on the things that really matter.

Grounded

More than simply a matter of dropping the lead rope and expecting a horse to stand still, horsesman Chris Cox says that ground-tying is the culmination of a solid ground-work program that teaches a horse respect.

LinesofCommunication

Reins are one of the strongest lines of communication with a horse and directly affect performance, yet rein-handling mistakes are common. Horseman and clinician Tom Curtin explain how to become a more effective rider by using reins correctly.